Online Pop Up Scam

Some of our members have reported being presented with an online pop-up message asking them to verify personal information such as their social security number. Reports indicate this is happening while making online purchases for items such as airline tickets. Do not share your personal information with anyone unless you are completely sure of their identity. WE WILL NOT EMAIL, GENERATE AN ONLINE POP UP OR CALL YOU TO VERIFY ANY OF YOUR PERSONAL OR FINANCIAL INFORMATION. If you encounter a pop-up such as this, please notify us by calling the SCU Member Service Center at 618-345-1000 or toll free at 1-800-888-4728 or you may email memberservice@scu.org. We will report any further information via this website.

Telephone Text Message Phishing Scam

Please be aware of a scam that is being circulated via telephone text messages in an attempt to get personal financial information. Some of our members have reported receiving a text message on their cell phone recently telling them that their debit card was suspended for shopping purchases. Then it gave an 800 number to call to reactivate the card. If you receive such a message, do not call the number provided. REMEMBER, WE WILL NOT EMAIL, TEXT OR CALL YOU ASKING YOU TO VERIFY ANY OF YOUR PERSONAL OR FINANCIAL INFORMATION. Do not share any of your information with anyone unless you are completely sure of their identity. If you receive a call, text or email requesting personal or financial information and you are unsure if it is legitimate, please call the SCU Member Service Center at 618-345-1000 or toll free at 1-800-888-4728.

Email Phishing Scam

Please be aware of a scam that is being circulated via email in an attempt to get personal financial information from members using our online services.
Some of our members have reported receiving an email recently that looks like it is from Scott Credit Union notifying them that their online access is being deactivated if it is not renewed.
WE ARE NOT DEACTIVATING OR DELETING ANY MEMBER’S ONLINE ACCESS OR BILL PAYMENT SERVICE.
Do not click on any links that are contained in the fraudulent email. To log into your SCU Online account, please visit our web site and login as you always have in the past.
We also have had members report that they have been asked via email to participate in a survey for our online department. WE ARE NOT CONDUCTING AN ONLINE SURVEY. THIS EMAIL IS NOT FROM SCOTT CREDIT UNION. Please do not click on any links in the email and DO NOT provide any personal or financial information through this email scam.
Remember, we will not email or call you asking you to verify any of your personal or financial information. Do not share any of your information with anyone unless you are completely sure of their identity. If you receive a call or email requesting personal or financial information and you are unsure if it is legitimate, please call the SCU Member Service Center at 618-345-1000 or toll free at 1-800-888-4728.

Protect Yourself and Your Identity

This page gives you information on how to Deter-Detect-Defend against Identity Theft. If you think you have been a victim of Identity Theft, click here for what you need to do right away.

Protecting yourself from Identity Theft is important. You can become a victim of Identity Theft in many ways. Here are some of the things you need to know to protect yourself .

DO..

* Shred all personal and financial information — such as bills, bank statements, ATM receipts and credit card offers — before you throw it away.
* Keep your personal documentation (e.g., birth certificate, Social Security card, etc.) and your bank and credit card records in a secure place.
* Call the post office immediately if you are not receiving your mail. To get the personal information needed to use your identity, a thief can forge your signature and have your mail forwarded. Be aware of your surroundings when entering your Personal Identification Number (PIN) at an ATM.
* Limit the number of credit cards and other personal information that you carry in your wallet or purse.
* Report lost or stolen credit cards immediately.
* Review and consider whether you need currently inactive card accounts. Even when not being used, these accounts appear on your credit report, which is accessible to thieves. If you have applied for a credit card and have not received the card in a timely manner, immediately notify the appropriate financial institution.
* Closely monitor the expiration dates on your credit cards. Contact the credit issuer if the replacement card is not received prior to your credit card’s expiration date.
* Sign all new credit cards upon receipt.
* Review your credit reports annually.
* Use passwords on your credit cards, bank accounts and phone cards. Avoid using the obvious passwords — your mother’s maiden name, your birth date or the last four digits of your Social Security or phone number.
* Match your credit card receipts against monthly bills to make sure there are no unauthorized charges.

DON’T…

* Volunteer any personal information when you use your credit card.
* Give your Social Security number, credit card number or any bank account details over the phone unless you have initiated the call and know that the business that you are dealing with is reputable.
* Leave receipts at ATMs, bank counters or unattended gasoline pumps.
* Leave envelopes containing your credit card payments or checks in your home mailbox for postal carrier pickup.
* Record your Social Security number or passwords on paper and store them in your wallet or purse. Memorize your numbers and/or passwords.
* Disclose bank account numbers, credit card account numbers or other personal financial data on any Web site or online service location, unless you receive a secured authentication key from your provider.

*Visa’s Zero Liability policy covers U.S.-issued cards only and does not apply to commercial credit cards, ATM transactions or PIN transactions not processed by Visa. Cardholders must notify card issuers promptly of any unauthorized use. Consult issuer for additional details or visit http://www.visa.com/security

Dumpster Diving:

* Thieves rummage through trash to find bills, credit card offers or other papers that include your personal information.

Lifting Information from Receipts and Records:

* One of the easiest ways a thief can obtain a person’s credit card number or other vital information is by taking advantage of carelessness. For example, you have just signed your receipt at the restaurant and you have left it there for the waiter/waitress. A thief can stop by the table, and copy down your information. In fact, the way technology is today, the thief can take a picture using a picture phone!

Information from Credit Reports

* Some identity thieves pose as a landlord, employer or someone else who may have a legitimate need for your credit report. Once they pull the credit report, they are able to retrieve your personal data, including credit card numbers, history, employment, and much more information.

Phishing

* Phishing is also referred to as brand spoofing or carding, it is a variation of “fishing,” in that the thief put out the bait in hopes that some will be tempted to partake. In a phishing scam, the thief sends thousands of e-mails that appear to come from sites that you trust (e.g., Scott Credit Union). These messages, pop-up windows and even the websites they link to appear to be official and legitimate. However, in the phishing scams, the link is not to an official website, but rather to a phony website. Once inside that website, you may be asked to provide a Social Security number, account numbers, passwords, or other information. When you provide the information, the thieves can begin to access your accounts or assume your identity.

Go to http://www.consumer.gov/idtheft for more information on how to Deter-Detect-Defend against Identity Theft.

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